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Dealing with dissatisfied customers: 5 Ways to do it

Dealing with customers is probably the most important and challenging task in a company.

Complaints are the most common occurrences in the auto repair industry, and any garage owner who says he never had one is most likely not being honest.

Things don’t always go as we expect, and sometimes we either make mistakes or we find people that are really hard to please. For this reason, as an entrepreneur, it is important to be aware that dissatisfied customers are inevitable. Therefore, you must be prepared to serve them and you should know how to deal with these situations.

Here are 5 ways to deal with dissatisfied customers in your workshop:

 

1. Be transparent

A good complaints and conflicts management involves transparency, which is why we decided to rank it first on our list.

When a customer calls to complain or asks for the complaints book, you should not tell them that they are wrong. Listen carefully to what the customer has to say – you will probably understand that many complaints are originated from difficulties in communication or from the inability to listen to both sides.

Surely, you will never tell a customer that he is wrong, and this is where “the customer is always right” saying comes in.

You will often encounter customers who want everything for free or who never seem to be satisfied. Remember that you are also a customer aside from your own business, and that all problems can be solved. Don’t act defensive and listen to what they have to say.

 

2. Apologize

Knowing how to respond to a complaint is critical.

After listening to your dissatisfied customer, try to understand what he is saying and apologize for what happened. By this, we do not mean that you have to admit that you did something wrong at all times, but you should let them know that you understand the situation.

Show him that you care by simply saying “we are sorry for what happened” and “let’s sort this situation out”. This does not admit guilt, it just lets the customer know that you are ready to solve his problem.

 

 

3. Show empathy

Empathy is not repeating “I understand” and having no idea what your client is talking about.

Dealing with clients in an exemplary way requires being empathetic and putting yourself in their shoes. If you are able to do so while avoiding arguing to win the discussion, you’ll solve the problem and ensure that your client is satisfied.

 

4. Solve the problem quickly

We all have priorities and, as an auto workshop owner, you will always have several tasks to do at the same time. However, it is important to keep in mind that your customers’ problems should always be at the top of your list of daily tasks.

The management of a workshop is not easy and there will always be something that will seem more important to you, but we can assure you that it is not. Think of yourself as a customer and how good it is to know that your problem is being solved quickly.

 

5. Take responsibility

The person answering a call from a dissatisfied customer has to take responsibility for solving their problem.

By passing the word from one person to another, you’re not only risking having the message delivered incorrectly, but also to pass the idea to the customer that there is no one in the company who is truly interested or committed in solving his/her problem.

Regardless of the type of problem, by keeping in touch with the customer throughout the process you will be able to show professionalism… and the customer will be happy, feeling that what he says really matters.

Having a successful workshop will require you dealing with customers, so it’s important that you put your energy into doing everything you can to retain them.

We believe that, by implementing these tips, you will not only learn how to handle customer’ complaints in an exemplary manner, but you will be able to keep them happier and, consequently, loyal.

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